Talking Food with In-Home Clients

Talking Food with In-Home Clients

In-home training can be a rewarding (and lucrative) career choice, but you have to set your own environment. Just like any coaching, you can get burnt out if you’re not careful. One of the best parts about IFASTU is the questions you all ask. It gets us thinking about things we’ve either taken for granted[…]

Help Any Client Achieve Their Goals

Help Any Client Achieve Their Goals Zac Cupples goes beyond mobility and reveals his 4-step process for addressing movement limitations

Note from Lance: Our special guest today is Zac Cupples, DPT, CSCS. I’ve been able to call Zac a friend since he did his clinical rotation with Bill Hartman in Indianapolis. I managed to pin him down for a half hour and teach us about his system for creating change, specifically through a movement lens. What is limiting YOU?


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Click Here to Download Zac’s PowerPoint – “The Movement Variability Hierarchy: Building Passive and Active Triplanar Movement Competency”


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I’m in the business of creating change, but — as you know — that stuff is HARD TO DO.

How do you simplify the process?

I like to outline things. When thoughts have a directional flow, it’s easier to keep everything straight. So I have to ask myself questions about each and every situation.

What kind of person is in front of me? And what am I going to do with him or her?

In this post, I’ll outline my process of helping people achieve their health and performance goals. We’ll discuss:

    • The 4 areas where we can start creating change
    • My main area of focus: physical activity
    • The 4 steps physical activity
    • Each step from my physical therapy view
    • Each step from my performance coach view
    • My progression for mobility
    • The 3 active mobility tests I use
    • Testing for arm motion with lower body tests
    • Runners who get pain after they run 5 miles
    • Patients who get back pain after they sit for 4 hours
    • Athletes who can’t play the whole game without pain
    • …and a bunch of other short examples to relate this system to your own clients

Please take this. It’s worked well for me. If you have suggestions, though, I’d love to hear about them in the comments below.
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What Should You Test? Evolution of the Assessment Process - Plus feet, hockey, and decision making

What Should You Test? Evolution of the Assessment Process Plus feet, hockey, and decision making

Some great discussion this month. Great to see some new faces. Members can download the notes to get the short version. [MM_Member_Decision isMember=’false’] Get the notes Click here to start your $1 trial [/MM_Member_Decision] [MM_Member_Decision membershipId=’!2′] Get the notes Click here to start your $1 trial [/MM_Member_Decision] [MM_Member_Decision membershipId=’2′] Click here to download the notes[…]

What Would You Do With This Baseball Player?

What Would You Do With This Baseball Player?

This video is an excerpt from the September 2017 Q&A with Bill Hartman.

This patient of mine was particularly interesting.

He’s a baseball player I’ve been seeing for a while now.

He came in the other day with mobile hips (a.k.a. “full lower body variability”). He was able to bring air into different parts of his rib cage as I demanded it from him.

But he still couldn’t rotate his shoulders well.

We tried traditional protraction-based exercsises. Those didn’t work.

Then I gave him manual work on his thorax. That didn’t work.

Then I noticed something.

Watch the video to hear about what I saw and what I did to get his shoulder rotation back.
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Choosing Corrective Exercises for the Upper Body: Why scap push ups won't fix winging shoulder blades

Choosing Corrective Exercises for the Upper Body Why scap push ups won't fix winging shoulder blades

Foreword

Do you use corrective exercise?

If you do, are you confident that you aren’t just wasting your client’s time?

Most clients think this kind of “exercise” is boring. And if you’ve only got 30 minutes with a client, are you really going to spend that much time on it? What’s left to address their actual goals?

We’ve put together this post–one of our most thorough–to help you pick an exercise or two that will help your client correct imbalances, gain mobility, and, ultimately, augment their training. It includes:

  1. a why do you need this introduction,
  2. a short lecture video of training theory,
  3. a lab demonstration video of exercises and cues to use, and
  4. a downloadable assessment sheet for you to use with your clients

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