Reflections on In-Home Training in the Past

Reflections on In-Home Training in the Past

In-home training can be a rewarding (and lucrative) career choice, but you have to set your own environment. Just like any coaching, you can get burnt out if you’re not careful.

One of the best parts about IFASTU is the questions you all ask. It gets us thinking about things we’ve either taken for granted or maybe even forgotten. I always find it helpful to revisit old topics because now I can look at them with fresh eyes.

This video is part of a 12-video series on in-home personal training.

  1. Equipment
  2. Handling Distractions
  3. Nutrition
  4. Training Frequency
  5. Building Resiliency
  6. Contracts and Fees
  7. Average Client Success
  8. Assessments
  9. Reflections

Video

Assessments for In-Home Clients

Assessments for In-Home Clients

In-home training can be a rewarding (and lucrative) career choice, but you have to set your own environment. Just like any coaching, you can get burnt out if you’re not careful.

One of the best parts about IFASTU is the questions you all ask. It gets us thinking about things we’ve either taken for granted or maybe even forgotten. I always find it helpful to revisit old topics because now I can look at them with fresh eyes.

This video is part of a 12-video series on in-home personal training.

  1. Equipment
  2. Handling Distractions
  3. Nutrition
  4. Training Frequency
  5. Building Resiliency
  6. Contracts and Fees
  7. Average Client Success
  8. Assessments
  9. Reflections

Video

Average Client Success with In-Home Training

Average Client Success with In-Home Training

In-home training can be a rewarding (and lucrative) career choice, but you have to set your own environment. Just like any coaching, you can get burnt out if you’re not careful.

One of the best parts about IFASTU is the questions you all ask. It gets us thinking about things we’ve either taken for granted or maybe even forgotten. I always find it helpful to revisit old topics because now I can look at them with fresh eyes.

This video is part of a 12-video series on in-home personal training.

  1. Equipment
  2. Handling Distractions
  3. Nutrition
  4. Training Frequency
  5. Building Resiliency
  6. Contracts and Fees
  7. Average Client Success
  8. Assessments
  9. Reflections

Video

Fee Structures for In-Home Training

Fee Structures for In-Home Training

In-home training can be a rewarding (and lucrative) career choice, but you have to set your own environment. Just like any coaching, you can get burnt out if you’re not careful.

One of the best parts about IFASTU is the questions you all ask. It gets us thinking about things we’ve either taken for granted or maybe even forgotten. I always find it helpful to revisit old topics because now I can look at them with fresh eyes.

This video is part of a 12-video series on in-home personal training.

  1. Equipment
  2. Handling Distractions
  3. Nutrition
  4. Training Frequency
  5. Building Resiliency
  6. Contracts and Fees
  7. Average Client Success
  8. Assessments
  9. Reflections

Part 1

Part 2

Building Resiliency for In-Home Clients

Resiliency for In-Home Clients

In-home training can be a rewarding (and lucrative) career choice, but you have to set your own environment. Just like any coaching, you can get burnt out if you’re not careful.

One of the best parts about IFASTU is the questions you all ask. It gets us thinking about things we’ve either taken for granted or maybe even forgotten. I always find it helpful to revisit old topics because now I can look at them with fresh eyes.

This video is part of a 12-video series on in-home personal training.

  1. Equipment
  2. Handling Distractions
  3. Nutrition
  4. Training Frequency
  5. Building Resiliency
  6. Contracts and Fees
  7. Average Client Success
  8. Assessments
  9. Reflections

Video

Training Frequency for In-Home Clients

Training Frequency for In-Home Clients

In-home training can be a rewarding (and lucrative) career choice, but you have to set your own environment. Just like any coaching, you can get burnt out if you’re not careful.

One of the best parts about IFASTU is the questions you all ask. It gets us thinking about things we’ve either taken for granted or maybe even forgotten. I always find it helpful to revisit old topics because now I can look at them with fresh eyes.

This video is part of a 12-video series on in-home personal training.

  1. Equipment
  2. Handling Distractions
  3. Nutrition
  4. Training Frequency
  5. Building Resiliency
  6. Contracts and Fees
  7. Average Client Success
  8. Assessments
  9. Reflections

Video

Talking Food with In-Home Clients

Talking Food with In-Home Clients

In-home training can be a rewarding (and lucrative) career choice, but you have to set your own environment. Just like any coaching, you can get burnt out if you’re not careful.

One of the best parts about IFASTU is the questions you all ask. It gets us thinking about things we’ve either taken for granted or maybe even forgotten. I always find it helpful to revisit old topics because now I can look at them with fresh eyes.

This video is part of a 12-video series on in-home personal training.

  1. Equipment
  2. Handling Distractions
  3. Nutrition
  4. Training Frequency
  5. Building Resiliency
  6. Contracts and Fees
  7. Average Client Success
  8. Assessments
  9. Reflections

Part 1

Part 2

Handling Distractions During In-Home Sessions

Handling Distractions During In-Home Sessions

In-home training can be a rewarding (and lucrative) career choice, but you have to set your own environment. Just like any coaching, you can get burnt out if you’re not careful.

One of the best parts about IFASTU is the questions you all ask. It gets us thinking about things we’ve either taken for granted or maybe even forgotten. I always find it helpful to revisit old topics because now I can look at them with fresh eyes.

This video is part of a 12-video series on in-home personal training.

  1. Equipment
  2. Handling Distractions
  3. Nutrition
  4. Training Frequency
  5. Building Resiliency
  6. Contracts and Fees
  7. Average Client Success
  8. Assessments
  9. Reflections

Video

Equipment for In-Home Personal Training

Equipment for In-Home Training

In-home training can be a rewarding (and lucrative) career choice, but you have to set your own environment. Just like any coaching, you can get burnt out if you’re not careful.

One of the best parts about IFASTU is the questions you all ask. It gets us thinking about things we’ve either taken for granted or maybe even forgotten. I always find it helpful to revisit old topics because now I can look at them with fresh eyes.

This video is part of a 12-video series on in-home personal training.

  1. Equipment
  2. Handling Distractions
  3. Nutrition
  4. Training Frequency
  5. Building Resiliency
  6. Contracts and Fees
  7. Average Client Success
  8. Assessments
  9. Reflections

Part 1

Part 2

Developing the Energy Systems Post-Rehab

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again…

Fatigue changes everything.

In order to return to athletic endeavors after physical therapy, there’s often a “conditioning” aspect that needs addressing.

In this Q&A, we chat about that very same topic!

A Rehab Perspective on Powerlifting and Weightlifting

At face value, barbell sports seem pretty distant from a movement education “mindset”. How much movement do you really need to know to squat, bench, and deadlift?

Well, it turns out that it can get pretty muddy.

What do you do when someone is shifting at their hips during their deadlift? Do you just deadlift more? Do you throw reverse hypers at them and hope it helps?

Specific knowledge of movement and anatomy can drastically speed up your progression of powerlifters and weightlifters. You just have to know what you’re looking for.

Developing Great Coaches – February 2019 Q&A with Mike Robertson

Most successful gym owners are successful by relying on the things that made them a good coach in their first place. They prioritize their personal brand, stand by what they believe, and — most importantly — get people results while having fun.

There may come a time in the gym owner’s life where they’re ready to hire someone new. How can they help ensure continued success of their business if they relinquish some of the control?

It’s a scary step, for sure… if you don’t have the right people on board.

In this Q&A, we discussed how to develop other coaches. How can you help young coaches gain the wisdom they need to be successful?

If you’ve got any other tips, throw them in a comment below. I know you all have a lot of good things to say and it would be a shame if you kept all those nuggets a secret.

Joint Positions are Important for Both Long- and Short-Duration Activities

This post is an excerpt from the October 2018 Q&A with Bill Hartman.

I wouldn’t take a linebacker and expect him to be a good distance runner.

People generally gravitate towards activities they are better at doing. People who like to run long distances might already possess more movement variability, allowing them to excel at running. The converse is true for people who gravitate towards powerlifting: they might have LESS movement variability and therefore do “better” under heavy loads.

Notice the Details

This post is an excerpt from the October 2018 Q&A with Bill Hartman.

Though systems like the human body are complex, they are still mutable. These systems can indeed experience large effects from small changes. “A butterfly flaps its wings…”

Why is movement any different than any other quality we train in the gym?

Uncertainty can drive a pattern. If your client doesn’t feel confident in what they’re doing, sometimes you can just give them a compliment to change it.

We could sit and discuss all of the complex neuroscience going into why that works, but we don’t really know. What we CAN do is take that information and consider it the next time that client walks in the door. Getting to know your people can go a long way.

Flexibility for Young Athletes

This post is an excerpt from the October 2018 Q&A with Mike Robertson.

Today many kids seem to be lacking in flexibility and mobility, should an extensive period of time be spent on trying to develop these skills?

Absolutely, we’ll always take the first 10 to 15 minutes to not only develop mobility and flexibility but also rhythm and coordination. And that should be the starting point, if a kid is lacking in these skills they have to be built first. Exercises you can use: various resets, some stretching, skipping, lunging, etc.