What to Do After an Internship

It takes time to study well.

Distraction is a huge barrier to early coaching success. Many of our interns get stuck in “Flavor of the Month” topics and never dive deep enough into one single topic.

One of the biggest barriers for our interns to overcome is also one of our biggest strengths here at IFAST. We have coaches who specialize in their own things: I like to talk about the psychology of coaching, Ty can relate anything to an athlete, Lance does… whatever he does.

This rounds out our business nicely because now we can served different populations at different times of day, maximizing our use of the space we rent.

But for an intern, they spend time with me working on cuing effectively, then Bill mentions something cool about complexity theory and they stop thinking about cuing and start thinking about dynamic systems theory.

…Or they hear Lance say something cool about the neck.

…Or they see Ty structure a drill in a simple, yet ingenious way.

All of these things are interesting and effective, but when you pinball back and forth between them, you never get deep into one topic.

If you hear people on the internet speak in cliches and generalities, they likely fall into this. It’s okay to communicate that way because it connects with certain people. Just make sure that YOU know what you mean EXACTLY.

Listen to the rest of my discussion on this below.


  1. Find the best fit for your personality. Are you broad or narrow?
  2. Use Pete Cicinelli’s method for studying to get the best of both worlds: deep knowledge in broad domains

Published by Jae Chung

I have a background in teaching the violin, T'ai Chi Ch'uan, English, writing, movement, and habit change. My main athletic accomplishments are spraining both ankles frequently and typing very fast.

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